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Mandatory Profiles

Posted by robd on December 23, 2014
Server / 1 Comment

Step 1 – Create a share for the Mandatory profile

On a central file server, create and share a folder that you want to use for the Mandatory profile. Apply the following share permissions;

Authenticated Users – Read
Administrators – Full Control

To provide better security, always create the share on a NTFS volume. Make sure you set the following NTFS access permissions (including child objects);

SYSTEM – Full Control
Administrators – Full Control
Authenticated Users – Read & Execute

Step 2 – Create a Share for the Folder Redirections

On a central file server, create and share a folder that you want to use for the folder redirections and apply the following share and NTFS permissions.

Share Permissions

Everyone – Change
Administrators – Full Control

NTFS Permissions

CREATOR OWNER (Subfolders and files only)
–        Full control
Authenticated Users (This folder only)
–        Traverse folder / execute files
–        List folder / read data
–        Read attributes
–        Read extended attributes
–        Create folders / append data
–        Read permissions
SYSTEM (This folder, subfolders and files)
–        Full control
Administrators (This folder, subfolders and files)
–        Full control

To configure that users only can see the files and folders they have access rights to, enable Access Based Enumeration on the share.

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Step 3 – Create a Local Template user

On a Windows 7 client create a Local non-administrative user account.

If you do create a Local administrator account you get the following unnecessary settings within the profile;

Software\Microsoft\Microsoft Management Console
Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Internet Settings\Zones\1 (through 4)

The last registry hive has a lot of setting… and why should you’re creating an administrator account anyway?

For this guide I will create a Template user with the name “robinhobo-com”.

Step 4 – Login with the Template account you just created

Login with the local user account created in step 3 and do the necessary customizations. To keep the profile as clean as possible, customize only what is necessary. Mostly I customize the Pinned Items, the System Tray icons behaviour and some Start Menu properties.

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I also remove all the public folders from the users Libraries. You can do this while customize the template user or afterwards by editing the library XML files (see step 5).

To clear the recently opened programs in the Start menu (as shown in the right image below), open the Taskbar and Start Menu Properties, open the Start Menu tab, unselect “Store and display recently opened programs in the Start menu” and “Store and display recently opened items in the Start menu and the taskbar” (as shown in the left image below), hit the Apply button. Now select both options again and click Apply.

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When you’re done with the customization of the profile, log out.

Step 5 – Clean up the Template user

First of all, I will make a local backup copy of the profile. As you can see in the picture below, all unnecessary shortcuts from the profile are automatically removed by this copy action.

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I will use the backup copy to finish the Mandatory profile. The next step is to load the NTUSER.DAT in the Registry Editor.

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Open the Registry Editor, select HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, open the File menu and select Load Hive..

Enter a key name, in this case I will give the key the name “PROFILEMAN”.

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Right click the Loaded Hive and select Permissions. Remove the template user and the administrators group. Add Authenticated Users and give this group Full Control permissions. Click OK.

Consider whether you can empty / delete the following registry keys in your environment;

–        <loaded hive>\Software\Microsoft\SoftGrid\4.5\Client\UserInfo\DataDirectory
–        <loaded hive>\Software\Microsoft\WAB\(Default)
–        <loaded hive>\Software\Policies
–        <loaded hive>\Software\Microsoft\CurrentVersion\Policies
–        <loaded hive>\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run
–        <loaded hive>\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\RunOnce

Within the <loaded hive> search for the template user name and replace it with %username%, except for Shell Folders.

Shell Folders

Shell Folders is a different story. Some people leave as it is, some people replaces the Template username with %username% and some people delete all the Shell Folder keys.
The problem is that some applications needs this keys to work well and they cannot handle with variables.

I will delete the keys except the “(default)”, “!Do not use this registry key” and “Fonts” and let Windows recreate the keys with the Active Setup at user logon.

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To do that delete the following registry key;

–        <loaded hive>\Software\Microsoft\Active Setup\Installed Components\{89820200-ECBD-11cf-8B85-00AA005B4340}

Now when the user logs on, the Active Setup will recreate the Shell Folders in the right way so that programs that need the Shell Folder keys will work well.

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Select the <loaded hive>, go the File menu and click on Unload Hive. Close the registry editor.

Delete the following files and folders within the profile folder;

–        AppData\Local
–        AppData\LocalLow
–        Contacts\<username>.contact
–        The .LOG1, .LOG2, .blf and the .regtrans-ms files

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Public Folders

As I mentioned in step 4 you can remove afterwards the public folders from the libraries.
To do so edit the following (hidden) files;

–        Documents.library-ms
–        Music.library-ms
–        Pictures.library-ms
–        Videos.library-ms

These files are located in the following location and are only visible through the command prompt;

C:\Users\<username>\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Libraries\

Remove the last “searchConnectorDescription” element from the files to remove the Public folder as shown in the picture below.

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Step 6 – Copy the profile to the network share

 Copy the profile to the network share created in step 1. Rename the folder to a name so that it is recognizable as a mandatory profile and append the .V2 extension to it.

Rename the NTUSER.DAT to NTUSER.MAN.

Step 7 – Add the profile to the user in AD:

Find a user in AD, go to Profile and change the path to the profile:

DO NOT INCLUDE THE .V2 OF THE PROFILE FOLDER.

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Enable Folder Redirection

To enable user folder redirection, apply the following GPO settings for (domain) users:

User Configuration > Policies > Windows Settings > Folder Redirection

You can redirect the following folders;

–        AppData (Roaming) (Not recommended with a mandatory profile)
–        Desktop
–        Start Menu
–        Documents
–        Pictures
–        Music
–        Videos
–        Favorites
–        Contacts
–        Downloads
–        Links
–        Searches
–        Saved Games
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On the Target tab select “Basic – Redirect everyone’s folder to the same location”. By Target folder location select “Create a folder for each user under the root path”. By Root Path fill in the share created in step 2. Make sure that “Grant the user exclusive rights to Documents” is deselected on the Settings tab.

To disable the message “Some library features are unavailable due to unsupported library locations” from appearing apply the following policy;

User Configuration > Policies > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > File Explorer

–        Turn off Windows Libraries features that rely on indexed file data – Enabled

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Roaming Proiles isuue Username.domain

Posted by robd on October 10, 2014
Windows 7 / 1 Comment

Problem:

1. Initial problem, A roaming profile user logs out and the profile isn’t deleted even though the Group policy “Remove roaming user profile on logoff” is set to delete profiles on logoff. I.e. You get this sort of thing in C:\Users\
Username.domain
Username.domain.001
Username.domain.002

The left behind profile only seem to contain “TextHarvester.Dat” i.e.
C:\Users\Username\AppData\Local\Microsoft\InputPersonalization\TextHarvester\TextHarvester.Dat

So, what is “TextHarvester.Dat”?

1. The TextHarvester.dat file is related to the Tablet Input Service (Touch and Pen input).
2. The folders are recreated when the Windows Search service is stopped and restarted.
3. Not really related but still relevant – is that Windows Vista/7 stores user profile information in the registry as well as in the filesystem so just deleting User folders isn’t good enough.
Solutions:

After a bunch of googling I found a hotfix:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2866086
Which we deployed via WSUS.

But since the faulty profiles are still there, we need to remove them so first to prevent the issue along side the hotfix:
1. Make Windows Search index only relevant stuff via group Policy.

In Group Policy, Enable…
Computer Configuration \ Policies \ Administrative Templates \ Windows Components \ Search \ Prevent indexing of certain file types
By default, when you enable this it pre-populates a list of file types including .dat.

issue

2. Download Delprof2.exe from HelgeKlein.

3. Stop the windows search features and Tablet input services and delete the profile with Delprof2.exe, you could make a batch file as below to do this:

Please note the above script came from here: Clicky

4. Deploy the script via shutdown GPO.

Done.

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